News Column

Findings from City University of Hong Kong Has Provided New Data on Magnetics

May 6, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Technology -- Current study results on Magnetics have been published. According to news reporting originating from Hong Kong, People's Republic of China, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, "To further increase the areal storage density of hard disk drive, one solution is to reduce the spacing between the magnetic head and disk to sub-1-nm regime. Such ultra-low spacing introduces great challenges to tribological reliability in the head-disk interface (HDI)."

Our news editors obtained a quote from the research from the City University of Hong Kong, "Therefore, it is necessary to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of HDI degradation in the tribological condition. This paper investigates the degradation behaviors of HDI based on an accelerated wear experiment. Acoustic emission and thermal asperity sensors were used simultaneously to monitor the touch down dynamics before and after each cycle of the overdrive test to characterize the HDI degradation behaviors."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Through analyzing the evolutions of HDI dynamic characteristics, the degradation mechanisms, including wear mechanism shift and HDI instability propagation were figured out."

For more information on this research see: Tribological Degradation of Head-Disk Interface in Hard Disk Drives Under Accelerated Wear Condition. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, 2014;50(3):27-33. IEEE Transactions on Magnetics can be contacted at: Ieee-Inst Electrical Electronics Engineers Inc, 445 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08855-4141, USA. (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers - www.ieee.org/; IEEE Transactions on Magnetics - ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=20)

The news editors report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Y. Wang, City University of Hong Kong, Dept. of Elect Engn, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China. Additional authors for this research include X.F. Wei, K.L. Tsui and T.W.S. Chow.

Keywords for this news article include: Asia, Hong Kong, Magnetics, People's Republic of China

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Journal of Technology