News Column

Researchers Submit Patent Application, "Optical Assembly for a Lighting Fixture", for Approval

May 7, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Electronics Newsweekly -- From Washington, D.C., VerticalNews journalists report that a patent application by the inventors Johns, Steven William (Vancouver, CA); Mezo, Zoltan (Surrey, CA), filed on January 18, 2012, was made available online on April 24, 2014.

The patent's assignee is Koninklijke Philips N.v.

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The utilization of optical films in lighting fixtures is generally known. Optical films may be utilized to inter alia, minimize hot spots from light sources, constrain and/or disperse lighting for control and/or uniformity, and/or create controlled patterns of light by redirecting light into a desired light distribution. Such optical films include those that utilize mesoOptics.RTM. technology available from Ledalite of Philips Lighting. Such optical films may be applied over a lens of a lighting fixture. Known methodologies of applying the optical films include the use of adhesives and other types of binding (e.g. heat binding). While such methodologies may be satisfactory in some implementations, in many implementations such methodologies may suffer from one or more drawbacks.

"For example, in some implementations known methodologies may be costly, may not enable flexible movement of the optical film atop the lens, and/or may not enable the optical film to be appropriately positioned relative to the lens.

"Thus, there is a need in the art to provide an optical assembly that includes a deformable structure that exerts force on an optical film that is placed atop a lens, to thereby compress the optical film against the lens and overcome one or more of the aforementioned or other problems with the known methodologies."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent application, VerticalNews correspondents also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent application: "The present disclosure is directed to inventive methods and apparatus for an optical assembly for a lighting fixture. For example, the optical assembly may include a lens having an interior and an exterior face. An optical film may be provided atop the interior face of the lens. A deformable structure may be positioned adjacent the optical film and exert force on the optical film, thereby compressing the optical film against the lens. Optionally, the deformable structure is deformed within a lip structure spaced apart from and extending above a portion of the interior face of the lens. Optionally, the interface between the optical film and the lens may be substantially adhesive free.

"Generally, in one aspect, a lighting fixture is provided that includes a housing and a longitudinally extending lens. The lens has a lens first latitudinal end, a lens second latitudinal end opposite the lens first latitudinal end, an interior face, and an exterior face opposite the interior face. The lighting fixture also includes a longitudinally extending first support structure supported by the housing. The first support structure extends at least partially between the first latitudinal end and the second latitudinal end and supports the lens. The first support structure includes an upper lip structure on a first side of the lens extending above a portion of the lens. The interior face of the lens generally faces the first side. The lighting fixture also includes an optical film atop the interior face of the lens. The optical film has an optical film first latitudinal end near the lens first latitudinal end and an optical film second latitudinal end near the lens second latitudinal end. The optical film extends between at least a portion of the upper lip structure and the lens. The lighting fixture also includes a deformable structure compressed between the upper lip structure and the optical film. The deformable structure exerts force on the optical film, thereby compressing the optical film against the lens.

"In some embodiments the lighting fixture further includes a longitudinally extending second support structure supported by the housing, wherein the second support structure and the first support structure flank the lens. In some versions of those embodiments the second support structure includes a second upper lip structure on the first side of the lens extending above a portion of the lens. Optionally, the optical film extends between at least a portion of the second upper lip structure and the lens, and the optical film is compression free where it extends between the second upper lip structure and the lens.

"In some embodiments the optical film first latitudinal end extends beyond the lens first latitudinal end. In some versions of those embodiments the lens first latitudinal end extends beyond the first support structure.

"In some embodiments the deformable structure is tubular.

"In some embodiments the deformable structure is less than fifteen percent of a length of the lens, the length of the lens being between the extent of the first latitudinal end and the extent of the second latitudinal end. In some versions of those embodiments the deformable structure is less than five percent of the length.

"In some embodiments the lens and the first support structure are formed as a cohesive integral piece.

"Generally, in another aspect a lighting fixture is provided that includes a housing having at least one light exit opening. A lens is supported by the housing across a majority of the light exit opening when installed in the housing. The lens has an interior face generally facing interiorly of the housing and an exterior face generally facing away from the housing when installed in the housing. A lip structure is spaced apart from and extends above a portion of the interior face of the lens proximal a peripheral portion of the lens. An optical film is provided atop the interior face of the lens. The interface between the optical film and the lens is substantially adhesive free. A deformable structure is compressed between the upper lip structure and the optical film and exerts force on the optical film, thereby compressing the optical film against the lens. The length of the deformable structure is substantially shorter than the length of the lens.

"In some embodiments the lens and the lip structure are formed as a cohesive integral piece.

"In some embodiments the deformable structure is tubular.

"In some embodiments the deformable structure is elastomeric.

"In some embodiments the interface between the optical film and the lens is completely adhesive free.

"In some embodiments the length of the deformable structure is less than ten percent of the length of the lens.

"In some embodiments the light exit opening includes an unbounded portion.

"Generally, in another aspect an optical assembly is provided that includes a lens having a generally planar first side, a second side generally opposite the first side, and a periphery therearound. The optically assembly also includes a lip structure coupled to the lens that is spaced apart from and extends above the first side of the lens. The optically assembly also includes an optical film atop the first side of the lens. The interface between the optical film and the lens is adhesive free. The optically assembly also includes a deformable structure compressed between the upper lip structure and the optical film. The deformable structure exerts force on the optical film, thereby compressing the optical film against the lens. The length of the deformable structure is less than fifteen percent of the length of the lens.

"In some embodiments the length of the deformable structure is less than five percent of the length of the lens.

"In some embodiments the lip structure is provided on a first longitudinal side of the lens and extends less than the length of the first longitudinal side of the lens.

"As used herein for purposes of the present disclosure, the term 'LED' should be understood to include any electroluminescent diode or other type of carrier injection/junction-based system that is capable of generating radiation in response to an electric signal. Thus, the term LED includes, but is not limited to, various semiconductor-based structures that emit light in response to current, light emitting polymers, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), electroluminescent strips, and the like. In particular, the term LED refers to light emitting diodes of all types (including semi-conductor and organic light emitting diodes) that may be configured to generate radiation in one or more of the infrared spectrum, ultraviolet spectrum, and various portions of the visible spectrum (generally including radiation wavelengths from approximately 400 nanometers to approximately 700 nanometers). Some examples of LEDs include, but are not limited to, various types of infrared LEDs, ultraviolet LEDs, red LEDs, blue LEDs, green LEDs, yellow LEDs, amber LEDs, orange LEDs, and white LEDs (discussed further below). It also should be appreciated that LEDs may be configured and/or controlled to generate radiation having various bandwidths (e.g., full widths at half maximum, or FWHM) for a given spectrum (e.g., narrow bandwidth, broad bandwidth), and a variety of dominant wavelengths within a given general color categorization.

"For example, one implementation of an LED configured to generate essentially white light (e.g., a white LED) may include a number of dies which respectively emit different spectra of electroluminescence that, in combination, mix to form essentially white light. In another implementation, a white light LED may be associated with a phosphor material that converts electroluminescence having a first spectrum to a different second spectrum. In one example of this implementation, electroluminescence having a relatively short wavelength and narrow bandwidth spectrum 'pumps' the phosphor material, which in turn radiates longer wavelength radiation having a somewhat broader spectrum.

"It should also be understood that the term LED does not limit the physical and/or electrical package type of an LED. For example, as discussed above, an LED may refer to a single light emitting device having multiple dies that are configured to respectively emit different spectra of radiation (e.g., that may or may not be individually controllable). Also, an LED may be associated with a phosphor that is considered as an integral part of the LED (e.g., some types of white LEDs). In general, the term LED may refer to packaged LEDs, non-packaged LEDs, surface mount LEDs, chip-on-board LEDs, T-package mount LEDs, radial package LEDs, power package LEDs, LEDs including some type of encasement and/or optical element (e.g., a diffusing lens), etc.

"The term 'light source' should be understood to refer to any one or more of a variety of radiation sources, including, but not limited to, LED-based sources (including one or more LEDs as defined above), incandescent sources (e.g., filament lamps, halogen lamps), fluorescent sources, phosphorescent sources, high-intensity discharge sources (e.g., sodium vapor, mercury vapor, and metal halide lamps), lasers, other types of electroluminescent sources, pyro-luminescent sources (e.g., flames), candle-luminescent sources (e.g., gas mantles, carbon arc radiation sources), photo-luminescent sources (e.g., gaseous discharge sources), cathode luminescent sources using electronic satiation, galvano-luminescent sources, crystallo-luminescent sources, kine-luminescent sources, thermo-luminescent sources, triboluminescent sources, sonoluminescent sources, radioluminescent sources, and luminescent polymers.

"A given light source may be configured to generate electromagnetic radiation within the visible spectrum, outside the visible spectrum, or a combination of both. Hence, the terms 'light' and 'radiation' are used interchangeably herein. Additionally, a light source may include as an integral component one or more filters (e.g., color filters), lenses, or other optical components. Also, it should be understood that light sources may be configured for a variety of applications, including, but not limited to, indication, display, and/or illumination. An 'illumination source' is a light source that is particularly configured to generate radiation having a sufficient intensity to effectively illuminate an interior or exterior space. In this context, 'sufficient intensity' refers to sufficient radiant power in the visible spectrum generated in the space or environment (the unit 'lumens' often is employed to represent the total light output from a light source in all directions, in terms of radiant power or 'luminous flux') to provide ambient illumination (i.e., light that may be perceived indirectly and that may be, for example, reflected off of one or more of a variety of intervening surfaces before being perceived in whole or in part).

"The term 'lighting fixture' is used herein to refer to an implementation or arrangement of one or more lighting units in a particular form factor, assembly, or package. The term 'lighting unit' is used herein to refer to an apparatus including one or more light sources of same or different types. A given lighting unit may have any one of a variety of mounting arrangements for the light source(s), enclosure/housing arrangements and shapes, and/or electrical and mechanical connection configurations. Additionally, a given lighting unit optionally may be associated with (e.g., include, be coupled to and/or packaged together with) various other components (e.g., control circuitry) relating to the operation of the light source(s). An 'LED-based lighting unit' refers to a lighting unit that includes one or more LED-based light sources as discussed above, alone or in combination with other non LED-based light sources. A 'multi-channel' lighting unit refers to an LED-based or non LED-based lighting unit that includes at least two light sources configured to respectively generate different spectrums of radiation, wherein each different source spectrum may be referred to as a 'channel' of the multi-channel lighting unit.

"It should be appreciated that all combinations of the foregoing concepts and additional concepts discussed in greater detail below (provided such concepts are not mutually inconsistent) are contemplated as being part of the inventive subject matter disclosed herein. In particular, all combinations of claimed subject matter appearing at the end of this disclosure are contemplated as being part of the inventive subject matter disclosed herein. It should also be appreciated that terminology explicitly employed herein that also may appear in any disclosure incorporated by reference should be accorded a meaning most consistent with the particular concepts disclosed herein.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"In the drawings, like reference characters generally refer to the same parts throughout the different views. Also, the drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead generally being placed upon illustrating the principles of the invention.

"FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of a modular lighting system having a first lighting fixture and a second lighting fixture; the first lighting fixture and the second lighting fixture are depicted exploded away from one another.

"FIG. 2A illustrates a section view of the second lighting fixture of the embodiment of FIG. 1 taken along the section line 2A-2A of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 2B shows a close up section view of a portion of the second lighting fixture generally indicated in FIG. 2A.

"FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of an optical assembly of the second lighting fixture of the embodiment of FIG. 1; an optical film of the optical assembly and a deformable structure of the optical assembly are shown exploded away from a lens of the optical assembly.

"FIG. 4 shows an unexploded perspective view of the optical assembly of FIG. 3.

"FIG. 5 shows a close up top view of a portion of the optical assembly of FIG. 4 generally indicated in FIG. 4; a portion of the optical film of the optical assembly is broken away to show a portion of the lens atop which the optical film lies.

"FIG. 6A shows a side section view of the optical assemblies of the first lighting fixture and the second lighting fixture of the embodiment of FIG. 1, when the lighting fixtures are coupled to one another in an end to end relationship.

"FIG. 6B shows a side section view of the optical assemblies of the first lighting fixture and the second lighting fixture of the embodiment of FIG. 1, when the lighting fixtures are coupled to one another in an end to end relationship, but the optical assemblies are vertically offset from one another.

"FIG. 7A shows a side section view of the first lighting fixture of the embodiment of FIG. 1 taken along the section line 7A-7A of FIG. 1.

"FIG. 7B shows a side section view of the first lighting fixture of the embodiment of FIG. 1 taken along the section line 7A-7A of FIG. 1, but with the lens of the optical assembly shown offset vertically and horizontally into the endcap."

For additional information on this patent application, see: Johns, Steven William; Mezo, Zoltan. Optical Assembly for a Lighting Fixture. Filed January 18, 2012 and posted April 24, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=4452&p=90&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140417.PD.&OS=PD/20140417&RS=PD/20140417

Keywords for this news article include: Electronics, Light-emitting Diode, Koninklijke Philips N.v..

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Electronics Newsweekly


Story Tools






HispanicBusiness.com Facebook Linkedin Twitter RSS Feed Email Alerts & Newsletters