News Column

ICYMI: Rockefeller Op-Ed: Can the Right Technology End Distracted Driving?

February 5, 2014



WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Ahead of tomorrow's Senate Commerce Committee summit that will explore technological solutions to distracted driving, an opinion-editorial by Chairman John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV appeared in today's Roll Call titled, "Can the Right Technology End Distracted Driving?"

The daylong summit, "Over-Connected and Behind the Wheel: A Summit on Technological Solutions to Distracted Driving", will explore how technology can be used to minimize distracted driving, which has become a major public safety concern in recent years.

The summit will consist of three roundtable discussions on the potential for technology to encourage the distractable driver to focus on driving. Rockefeller will open the final roundtable, at 2:30 p.m., on current and potential technology that can limit distractions and focus the driver on the road.

The summit will be held in 253 Russell Senate Office Building, and it is open to the public and media. If you are unable to attend in person, the three roundtable discussions will be streamed live on the Commerce Committee website at commerce.senate.gov.

Can the Right Technology End Distracted Driving?

By Sen. Jay Rockefeller

Roll Call

Feb. 5, 2014

At any given moment during any given day, hundreds of thousands of drivers in the United States are using their phones while behind the wheel -- talking, texting or searching for information -- and endangering their lives and the lives of those around them. Technology may be part of our daily habits, but using these devices while driving is becoming a fatal vice that threatens to undo the remarkable progress we have made to improve highway safety. According to the National Safety Council, as many as a quarter of today's automobile crashes involve drivers talking or texting on their phones, and there is no sign of the problem abating.

Surveys show that nearly all Americans know the perils of distracted driving -- that texting behind the wheel, for instance, makes it 23 times more likely that they will be involved in a crash. Yet the temptations to use electronic devices, and the resulting tragedies, persist.

Auto companies and the software industry are now eagerly developing in-car "infotainment" systems that offer ever-more connectivity and features to mirror the temptations of our smartphones. They say consumers are demanding constant connectivity in the car, and that these systems are safer than the alternatives. Further, they claim transferring such functionalities from the phone to the built-in system will reduce distractions and increase our safety because drivers will put down their phones.

Despite these new advances, I reject this "lesser of two evils" reasoning that, because in-car infotainment systems are supposedly safer than hand-held smartphones, they belong in cars. Lost amid this focus on a technological solution is careful consideration of whether these onboard systems should, in fact, replicate so much of the connectivity -- a lot of it completely unrelated to driving -- that we have on smartphones. For instance, I see no reason drivers should be able to update their social-media profiles or compare restaurant and hotel reviews while behind the wheel. Furthermore, researchers have shown that distractions come in different forms, and, while these in-car systems can reduce the amount of time that the drivers' hands and eyes are off the wheel and the road, attention can still dangerously wander.

In contrast to the current industry approach, I believe we should be leveraging the technology in our cars and harnessing the same ingenuity to reduce distracted driving, rather than creating new forms of distraction. Many drivers may, in fact, prefer to limit their distractions while they are on the road. And many parents would like the ability to establish such limitations for teen drivers in their family. Perhaps we should be looking to limit the functionality of mobile and built-in technologies, rather than accommodate them.

I strongly believe phones should be capable of automatically limiting functionalities while in the car, whether the phones are connected to the in-car systems or not. We know that technological means of accomplishing this already exist, but they are not widely available and do not seamlessly operate across software platforms. Mobile device-makers, software developers, automakers and wireless carriers should be working collaboratively now to remove these obstacles. This is a problem that cannot be solved by just one industry alone, and I would like to see broad cooperation across the spectrum of stakeholders.

Later this week, I am convening a summit on this critical public safety matter and bringing all of the key industries to the same table and pushing them to act -- and to act now. Over the course of my chairmanship of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, I have dedicated significant attention to protecting Americans on our nation's roadways. Yes, the car has never been safer, and technology has been a key ingredient in that success, but this progress is being undermined by the glut of nonessential technology that has nothing to do with the task of driving.

It is my hope and expectation that the summit will spur industries to proactively seek technological solutions that can be widely adopted, readily available, and highlight to the public the life-or-death matter of staying focused behind the wheel.

Read this original document at: http://www.commerce.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=b1e6b6d6-fdc1-4bcd-a26d-c696ffa0525c&ContentType_id=77eb43da-aa94-497d-a73f-5c951ff72372&Group_id=1d6521ef-f1d5-407b-a471-1ae71d0935b3


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Source: Congressional Documents & Publications


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