News Column

Researchers Submit Patent Application, "Devices and Methods for Securing Medical Devices within an Anatomy", for Approval

March 6, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Politics & Government Week -- From Washington, D.C., VerticalNews journalists report that a patent application by the inventors O'Hara, Michael L. (Baltimore, MD); Eskaros, Sherif A. (Elkton, MD); Warner, Clifford P. (West Chester, PA), filed on August 7, 2013, was made available online on February 20, 2014.

The patent's assignee is W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc.

News editors obtained the following quote from the background information supplied by the inventors: "The present disclosure generally relates to the field of medicine, and more particularly to securing devices, such as sutures and anchors, for securing medical devices within an anatomy or body (e.g., a human body).

"A variety of medical devices have been developed for implantation within an anatomy or body (e.g., a human body). Many such devices are implantable within a body lumen (e.g., the vasculature and/or gastrointestinal tract ('GI tract') of a human body). For instance, devices like stents, grafts, and stent-grafts may be implanted within the vasculature and/or GI tract of a human body to reinforce, replace, and/or bridge a damaged, unhealthy, or otherwise diseased portion of a body lumen. These devices may thus, in certain instances, guide blood and/or other material through a lumen defined by a cylindrical interior surface. During implantation, however, it is often necessary to anchor such devices in place, so that they will not migrate away from a damaged or diseased portion of the anatomy they are intended to repair.

"Although techniques have been developed to hold devices like those described above in place, these techniques may suffer from a variety of shortcomings. For instance, a securing device (such as a medical suture, anchor, staple, or barb) may entirely penetrate a body lumen, such that a sharpened portion of the securing device is exposed to (and may damage) surrounding tissue. Similarly, a securing device may be deployed too tightly against a lumen wall, which may cause the securing device to migrate, over time, through the lumen wall. This may eventually free an implanted medical device from its proper location within a lumen. In addition, a securing device may be deployed such that it cannot be (easily) removed from a body lumen. For instance, although removal of a securing device may benefit an adequately healed patient and/or become necessary to relocate an improperly situated medical device, removal may yet be difficult, if not ill advised.

"More suitable techniques for securing a medical device to an intended location are therefore desirable. For instance, a securing device capable of removal and/or relocation is desirable, particularly where a patient may not require permanent implantation of a medical device and/or the medical device is situated incorrectly. Similarly, a securing device capable of partial implantation in a vessel wall (e.g., such that surrounding tissue is not exposed to a sharpened or pointed portion of the device) is desirable. Likewise, a securing device resistant to migration is also beneficial and desirable."

As a supplement to the background information on this patent application, VerticalNews correspondents also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent application: "The present disclosure includes a securing device comprising a medical suture. In various embodiments, a suture may comprise a length of shape memory wire having a proximal stop tab, a body portion, and/or a sharp distal end. A suture may further curve or develop a curvature during deployment such that the suture may couple or stitch, for example, a medical device to a body lumen. The suture may only partially penetrate a body lumen. A suture may be stabilized during deployment and/or pressed against tissue to be sutured by a stabilizing device.

"Further, in various embodiments, the present disclosure includes a securing device comprising an everting anchor. Such an anchor may evert during deployment to form a first anchor arm having a first arc ending in a first pointed or sharpened tip. An anchor may further evert during deployment to form a second anchor arm having a second arc ending in a second pointed or sharpened tip. An everting anchor may resemble a 'seagull' in shape, and in a deployed configuration, the anchor may only partially penetrate a body lumen.

"Further still, in various embodiments, the present disclosure includes a securing device comprising an inverting anchor. An inverting anchor may comprise a plurality of tines depending from a central portion. Each tine may invert during deployment to grasp a lumen wall. A profile defined by the endpoints of each of the plurality of tines may be substantially elliptical.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"The features and advantages of the present disclosure will become more apparent from the detailed description set forth below when taken in conjunction with the drawings, wherein:

"FIG. 1A illustrates a perspective view of a suture having a stop tab;

"FIG. 1B illustrates a perspective view of a suture;

"FIG. 2 illustrates a perspective view of a sharp suture deploying from a delivery lumen;

"FIG. 3 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a suture deployed within a body lumen in which the suture is aided by an expandable stabilizing device;

"FIG. 4 illustrates a cross-sectional view of a suture deployed within a body lumen in which the suture is aided by a wire stabilizing device;

"FIG. 5A illustrates a front view of an everting anchor;

"FIG. 5B illustrates a first front view of an everting anchor deploying from a delivery lumen;

"FIG. 5C illustrates a second front view of an everting anchor deploying from a lumen;

"FIG. 5D illustrates a cross-sectional view of an everting anchor deployed within a body lumen;

"FIG. 6A illustrates a perspective view of an inverting anchor in an undeployed configuration;

"FIG. 6B illustrates a perspective view of an inverting anchor in a deployed configuration;

"FIG. 7A illustrates a perspective view of a plurality of undeployed inverting anchors coupled to a medical device; and

"FIG. 7B illustrates a perspective view of a plurality of deployed inverting anchors coupled to a medical device."

For additional information on this patent application, see: O'Hara, Michael L.; Eskaros, Sherif A.; Warner, Clifford P. Devices and Methods for Securing Medical Devices within an Anatomy. Filed August 7, 2013 and posted February 20, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1246&p=25&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140213.PD.&OS=PD/20140213&RS=PD/20140213

Keywords for this news article include: W.L. Gore & Associates Inc.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2014, NewsRx LLC


For more stories covering the world of technology, please see HispanicBusiness' Tech Channel



Source: Politics & Government Week


Story Tools