News Column

SONIC FOUNDRY INC - 10-Q - MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

February 13, 2014

Risks and Uncertainties

The following discussion of the consolidated financial position and results of operations of the Company should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Form 10-Q and the Company's annual report filed on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2013. In addition to historical information, this discussion contains forward-looking statements such as statements of the Company's expectations, plans, objectives and beliefs. These statements use such words as "may," "will," "expect," "anticipate," "believe," "plan," and other similar terminology.

Actual results could differ materially from expectations due to changes in the market acceptance of our products, competition, market introduction or product development delays; all of which would impact our strategy to develop a network of inside regional sales managers and distribution partners that target customer opportunities for multi-unit and repeat purchases. If the Company does not achieve multi-unit and repeat purchases, our business will be harmed.

Our future success will continue to depend upon our ability to develop new products, product enhancements or service offerings that address future needs of our target markets and to respond to these changing standards and practices. The success of new products, product enhancements or service offerings depend on several factors, including the timely completion, quality and market acceptance of the product, enhancement or service. Our revenue could be reduced if we do not capitalize on our current market leadership by timely development of innovative new products, product enhancements or service offerings that will increase the likelihood that our products and services will be accepted in preference to the products and services of our current and future competitors.

With the continued global economic pressure experienced in fiscal 2013, there is a continuing risk of further weakening in conditions, particularly with those customers that rely on local, state or Federal government funding. Any continuing unfavorable economic conditions could continue to negatively affect, our business, operating results or financial condition, which could in turn affect our stock price. Weak economic conditions and the resulting impact on the availability of public funds along with the possibility of state and local budget cuts and reduced university enrollment could lead to a reduction in demand for our products and services. In addition, a prolonged economic downturn could cause insolvency of key suppliers resulting in product delays, inability of customers to obtain credit to finance purchases of the Company's products and inability or delay of our channel partners and other customers to pay accounts receivable owed to us.

Most of our customers and potential customers are public colleges, universities, schools and other education providers who depend substantially on government funding. Accordingly, any general decrease, delay or change in federal, state or local funding for colleges, universities, schools and other education providers could cause our current and potential customers to reduce their purchases of our products and services, or to decide not to renew service contracts, either of which could cause us to lose revenues. In addition, a specific reduction in governmental funding support for products such as ours would also cause us to lose revenues. The severe economic downturn experienced in the U.S. and globally has caused many of our clients to experience severe budgetary pressures, which has and will likely continue to have a negative impact on sales of our products. Continuing unfavorable economic conditions may result in further budget cuts and lead to lower overall spending, including information technology spending, by our current and potential clients, which may cause our revenues to decrease.

We subcontract the manufacture of our recorders to one third-party contract manufacturer. Although we believe there are multiple sources of supply from other contract manufacturers as well as multiple suppliers of component parts required by our contract manufacturer, a disruption of supply of component parts or completed products, even if short term, would have a material negative impact on our revenues. Many component parts currently have long delivery lead times or cease production of certain components with limited notice in which to evaluate or obtain alternate supply, requiring careful estimation of production requirements. Lengthening lead times, product design changes and other third party manufacturing disruptions have caused delays in delivery. In order to compensate for supply delays, we have sourced components from off-shore sources, used cross component parts, paid significantly higher prices or extra fees to expedite delivery for short supply components, and currently hold substantially larger

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quantities of inventory than in the past. Many of these strategies have increased our costs and may not be sufficient to ensure against production delays. We depend on our subcontract manufacturer to produce our products efficiently while maintaining high levels of quality. Any manufacturing defects, delay in production or changes in product features will likely cause customer dissatisfaction and may harm our reputation. Moreover, any incapacitation of the manufacturing site due to destruction, natural disaster or similar events could result in a loss of product inventory. As a result of any of the foregoing, we may not be able to meet demand for our products, which could negatively affect revenues in the quarter of the disruption or longer depending upon the magnitude of the event, and could harm our reputation.

We recently announced that we have purchased the remaining shares of stock that we do not already own in Mediasite KK and the stock of MediaMission. In the future, we may acquire or form strategic alliances or partnerships with other businesses in order to remain competitive or to acquire new technologies. MediaMission contributed revenue of approximately $90 thousand and net income of approximately $43 thousand for the period from the date of acquisition to December 31, 2013. As a result of these acquisitions, strategic alliances or partnerships, including Mediasite KK and MediaMission, we may need to integrate products, technologies, widely dispersed or overseas operations and distinct corporate cultures. In particular for Mediasite KK in Japan and MediaMission in the Netherlands, we will have to integrate the distinct corporate culture in those locations. In other acquisitions, the products, services or technologies of future acquired companies may need to be altered or redesigned in order to be made compatible with our software products and services, or the software architecture of our customers. These integration efforts, including the acquisitions of Mediasite KK and MediaMission, may not succeed or may distract our management from operating our existing business. The acquisitions of Mediasite KK and MediaMission, and other future acquisitions could expose us to unexpected liabilities, regulations or costs, including tax or other regulatory items impacting repatriation of profits. Our failure to successfully manage the acquisitions of Mediasite KK and MediaMission, and other future acquisitions, strategic alliances or partnerships could seriously harm our operating results. In addition, our stockholders would be diluted if we finance the future acquisitions, strategic alliances or partnerships by incurring convertible debt or issuing equity securities.

Other factors that may impact actual results include: length of time necessary to close on sales leads to multi-unit purchasers, our ability to service existing accounts, global and local business conditions, legislation and governmental regulations, competition, our ability to effectively maintain and update our product portfolio, shifts in technology, political or economic instability in local markets, and currency and exchange rate fluctuations, as well as other issues which may be identified from time to time in Sonic Foundry'sSecurities and Exchange Commission filings and other public announcements.

Overview

Sonic Foundry, Inc. is a technology leader in the emerging web communications marketplace, providing video content management and distribution for education, business and government. Using the Mediasite webcasting platform and webcast services of the Company's events team, the Company empowers our customers to advance how they share knowledge online, using video webcasts to bridge time and distance, enhance learning outcomes and improve performance.

New Accounting Pronouncements

Accounting standards that have been issued by the FASB or other standards-setting bodies that do not require adoption until a future date are not expected to have a material impact on the Company's financial statements upon adoption.

Critical Accounting Policies

We have identified the following as critical accounting policies to our Company and have discussed the development, selection of estimates and the disclosure regarding them with the audit committee of the board of directors:

Revenue recognition, allowance for doubtful accounts and reserves; Impairment of long-lived assets; 19



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Table of Contents Valuation allowance for net deferred tax assets; Accounting for stock-based compensation; Capitalized software development costs; and Valuation of assets and liabilities in business combinations



Revenue Recognition, Allowance for Doubtful Accounts and Reserves

General

Revenue is recognized when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery occurs or services are rendered, the sales price is fixed or determinable and collectability is reasonably assured. Revenue is deferred when undelivered products or services are essential to the functionality of delivered products, customer acceptance is uncertain, significant obligations remain, or the fair value of undelivered elements is unknown. The Company does not offer customers the right to return product, other than for exchange or repair pursuant to a warranty or stock rotation. The Company's policy is to reduce revenue if it incurs an obligation for price rebates or other such programs during the period the obligation is reasonably estimated to occur. The following policies apply to the Company's major categories of revenue transactions.

Products

Products are considered delivered, and revenue is recognized, when title and risk of loss have been transferred to the customer. Under the terms and conditions of the sale, this occurs at the time of shipment to the customer. Product revenue currently represents sales of our Mediasite recorders and Mediasite related products such as our server software and other software licenses. If a license is time-based, the revenue is recognized over the term of the license agreement.

Services

The Company sells support and content hosting contracts to its customers, typically one year in length, and records the related revenue ratably over the contractual period. Our support contracts cover phone and electronic technical support availability over and above the level provided by our distribution partners, software upgrades on a when and if available basis, advance hardware replacement and an extension of the standard hardware warranty from 90 days to one year. The manufacturers we contract with to build the units provide a limited one-year warranty on the hardware. We also sell installation, training, event webcasting, and customer content hosting services. Revenue for those services is recognized when performed in the case of installation, training and event webcasting services. Service amounts invoiced to customers in excess of revenue recognized are recorded as deferred revenue until the revenue recognition criteria are met.

Revenue Arrangements that Include Multiple Elements

Sales of software, with or without installation, training, and post customer support fall within the scope of the software revenue recognition rules. Under the software revenue recognition rules, the fee from a multiple-deliverable arrangement is allocated to each of the undelivered elements based upon vendor-specific objective evidence (VSOE), which is limited to the price charged when the same deliverable is sold separately, with the residual value from the arrangement allocated to the delivered element. The portion of the fee that is allocated to each deliverable is then recognized as revenue when the criteria for revenue recognition are met with respect to that deliverable. If VSOE does not exist for all of the undelivered elements, then all revenue from the arrangement is typically deferred until all elements have been delivered to the customer. All revenue arrangements, with the exception of hosting contracts, entered into prior to October 1, 2010 and the sale of all software-only products and associated services have been accounted for under this guidance.

In the case of the Company's hardware products with embedded software, the Company has determined that the hardware and software components function together to deliver the product's essential functionality, and therefore, the revenue from the sale of these products is accounted for under the revenue recognition rules for tangible products whereby the fee from a multiple-deliverable arrangement is allocated to each of the deliverables based upon their relative selling prices as determined by a selling-price hierarchy. A deliverable in an arrangement

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qualifies as a separate unit of accounting if the delivered item has value to the customer on a stand-alone basis. A delivered item that does not qualify as a separate unit of accounting is combined with the other undelivered items in the arrangement and revenue is recognized for those combined deliverables as a single unit of accounting. The selling price used for each deliverable is based upon VSOE if available, third-party evidence (TPE) if VSOE is not available, and best estimate of selling price (ESP) if neither VSOE nor TPE are available. TPE is the price of the Company's or any competitor's largely interchangeable products or services in stand-alone sales to similarly situated customers. ESP is the price at which the Company would sell the deliverable if it were sold regularly on a stand-alone basis, considering market conditions and entity-specific factors. All revenue arrangements negotiated after September 30, 2010, excluding the sale of all software-only products and associated services, have been accounted for under this guidance.

The selling prices used in the relative selling price allocation method are as follows: (1) the Company's products and services are based upon VSOE and (2) hardware products with embedded software, for which VSOE does not exist, are based upon ESP. The Company does not believe TPE exists for any of these products and services because they are differentiated from competing products and services in terms of functionality and performance and there are no competing products or services that are largely interchangeable. Management establishes ESP for hardware products with embedded software using a cost plus margin approach with consideration for market conditions, such as the impact of competition and geographic considerations, and entity-specific factors, such as the cost of the product and the Company's profit objectives. Management believes that ESP is reflective of reasonable pricing of that deliverable as if priced on a stand-alone basis. When a sales transaction includes deliverables that are divided between ASC Topic 605 and ASC Subtopic 985-605, the Company allocates the selling price using the relative selling price method whereas value is allocated using an ESP for software developed using a percent of list price approach. The other deliverables are valued using ESP or VSOE as previously discussed.

While the pricing model, currently in use, captures all critical variables, unforeseen changes due to external market forces may result in a revision of the inputs. These modifications may result in the consideration allocation differing from the one presently in use. Absent a significant change in the pricing inputs or the way in which the industry structures its deals, future changes in the pricing model are not expected to materially affect our allocation of arrangement consideration.

Management has established VSOE for hosting services. Billings for hosting are spread ratably over the term of the hosting agreement, with the typical hosting agreement having a term of 12 months, with renewal on an annual basis. The Company sells most hosting contracts without the inclusion of products. When the hosting arrangement is sold in conjunction with product, the product revenue is recognized immediately while the remaining hosting revenue is spread ratably over the term of the hosting agreement. The selling price is allocated between these elements using the relative selling price method. The Company uses ESP for development of the selling price for hardware products with embedded software.

The Company also offers hosting services bundled with events services. The Company uses VSOE to establish relative selling prices for its events services. The Company recognizes events revenue when the event takes place and recognizes the hosting revenue over the term of the hosting agreement. The total amount of the arrangement is allocated to each element based on the relative selling price method.

Reserves

We record reserves for stock rotations, price adjustments, rebates, and sales incentives to reduce revenue and accounts receivable for these and other credits we may grant to customers. Such reserves are recorded at the time of sale and are calculated based on historical information (such as rates of product stock rotations) and the specific terms of sales programs, taking into account any other known information about likely customer behavior. If actual customer behavior differs from our expectations, additional reserves may be required. Also, if we determine that we can no longer accurately estimate amounts for stock rotations and sales incentives, we would not be able to recognize revenue until the resellers sell the inventory to the final end user.

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Credit Evaluation and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

We assess the realization of our receivables by performing ongoing credit evaluations of our customers' financial condition. Through these evaluations, we may become aware of a situation where a customer may not be able to meet its financial obligations due to deterioration of its financial viability, credit ratings or bankruptcy. Our reserve requirements are based on the best facts available to us and are reevaluated and adjusted as additional information is received. Our reserves are also based on amounts determined by using percentages applied to certain aged receivable categories. These percentages are determined by a variety of factors including, but not limited to, current economic trends, historical payment and bad debt write-off experience. Allowance for doubtful accounts for accounts receivable was $90,000 at December 31, 2013 and September 30, 2013.

Impairment of long-lived assets

We assess the impairment of goodwill on an annual basis or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the fair value of these assets is less than the carrying value. In fiscal 2012 with the adoption of ASU 2011-08, "Testing Goodwill for Impairment", we first assessed qualitative factors related to goodwill to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis for determining whether it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill test. The more-likely-than-not threshold is defined as having a likelihood of more than 50 percent. Using the qualitative assessment, we determined that the fair value of goodwill is more likely than not greater than its carrying amount thus step two was not deemed necessary to perform. In fiscal 2013, we performed the two-step goodwill test and determined that the fair value of goodwill is more than the carrying value. The Company has recognized no impairment charges as of December 31, 2013.

If we had determined that the fair value of goodwill is less than its carrying value, based upon the annual test or the existence of one or more indicators of impairment, we would have then measured impairment based on a comparison of the implied fair value of goodwill with the carrying amount of goodwill. To the extent the carrying amount of goodwill is greater than the implied fair value of goodwill, we would have recorded an impairment charge for the difference.

Long-lived assets and intangible assets other than goodwill are evaluated for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable based on expected undiscounted cash flows attributable to that asset.

Valuation allowance for net deferred tax assets

Deferred income taxes are provided for temporary differences between financial reporting and income tax basis of assets and liabilities, and are measured using currently enacted tax rates and laws. Deferred income taxes also arise from the future benefits of net operating loss carryforwards. A valuation allowance equal to 100% of the net deferred tax assets has been recognized due to uncertainty regarding future realization.

Accounting for stock-based compensation

The Company uses a lattice valuation model to account for all stock options granted. The lattice valuation model provides a flexible analysis to value options because of its ability to incorporate inputs that change over time, such as actual exercise behavior of option holders. The Company uses historical data to estimate the option exercise and employee departure behavior in the lattice valuation model. Expected volatility is based on historical volatility of the Company's stock. The Company considers all employees to have similar exercise behavior and therefore has not identified separate homogenous groups for valuation. The expected term of options granted is derived from the output of the option pricing model and represents the period of time that options granted are expected to be outstanding. The risk-free rate for periods the options are expected to be outstanding is based on the U.S. Treasury yields in effect at the time of grant. Forfeitures are based on actual behavior patterns.

Capitalized Software Development Costs

Software development costs incurred in conjunction with product development are charged to research and development expense until technological feasibility is established. Thereafter, until the product is released for sale, software development costs are capitalized and reported at the net realizable value of the related product. Typically the period between achieving technological feasibility of the Company's products and the general availability of the products has been short. Consequently, software development costs qualifying for capitalization are typically immaterial and are generally expensed to research and development costs. During 2013, the Company's My

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Mediasite product release required software capitalization since there was a longer period between technological feasibility and the general availability of the product. Upon product release, the amortization of software development costs is determined annually as the greater of the amount computed using the ratio of current gross revenues for the products to their total of current and anticipated future gross revenues or the straight-line method over the estimated economic life of the products, expected to be three years. Amortization expense of software development costs of $44 thousand for the three months ending December 31, 2013 is included in Cost of Revenue - Product. There was no amortization expense of software development costs in the three months ending December 31, 2012. The gross amount of capitalized external and internal development costs is $533 at December 31, 2013 and at September 30, 2013.

Valuation of Assets and Liabilities in Business Combinations

The assets acquired and the liabilities assumed in a business combination shall be measured at fair value. Fair value is based on the definition in ASC 820-10-20 as the price that would be received from the sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants. Variations of the cost, market and income approaches are used to measure the fair value of components of working capital (e.g. accounts receivable, inventory and accounts payable) and tangible assets, such as property plant and equipment. When measuring the fair value of acquired intangible assets, the income, market and cost approaches are generally considered. Financial assets and liabilities are valued based on a quoted price in an active market. In the absence of a quoted market price a valuation technique is used to determine fair value, such as a market approach or an income approach. Non-financial liabilities may be valued based on a transfer approach. These measures require significant judgment including estimates of expected cash flow, or discount rates among others.

Results of Continuing Operations

Revenue

Revenue from our business includes the sale of Mediasite recorders and server software products and related services contracts, such as customer support, installation, training, content hosting and event services. We market our products to educational institutions, corporations and government agencies that need to deploy, manage, index and distribute video content on Internet-based networks. We reach both our domestic and international markets through reseller networks, a direct sales effort and partnerships with system integrators.

Q1-2014 compared to Q1-2013



Revenue in Q1-2014 increased $654 thousand, or 10% from Q1-2013 revenue of $6.6 million to $7.2 million. Revenue consisted of the following:

Product revenue from sale of Mediasite recorder units and server software was $2.8 million in both Q1-2014 and Q1-2013. The average sales price per unit was impacted by the lower price realized on a large international transaction as well as a greater mix of lower priced rack recorders. Q1-2014 Q1-2013 Recorders sold 301 270 Rack units to mobile units ratio 2.0 to 1 1.0 to 1 Average sales price, excluding service (000's) $ 8.8$ 9.7 Refresh Units 105 116 Services revenue represents the portion of fees charged for Mediasite customer support contracts amortized over the length of the contract, typically 12 months, as well as training, installation, event and content hosting services. Services revenue increased from $3.6 million in Q1-2013 to $4.3 million in Q1-2014 primarily due to an increase in events services billings. At December 31, 2013, $7.0 million of revenue was deferred, of which we expect to recognize $6.1 million in the next twelve months, including approximately $2.5 million in the quarter ending March 31, 2014. At September 30, 2013, $7.1 million of revenue was deferred, of which $6.5 million was expected to be recognized in fiscal 2014. 23



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Other revenue relates to freight charges billed separately to our customers.

Gross Margin Q1-2014 compared to Q1-2013



Gross margin for Q1-2014 was $5.4 million or 75% of revenue compared to Q1-2013 of $4.9 million or 74%. The significant components of cost of revenue include:

Material and freight costs for the Mediasite recorders. Costs for Q1-2014 Mediasite recorder hardware and other costs totaled $1 million, along with $73 thousand of freight costs, and $279 thousand of labor and allocated costs compared to Q1-2013 Mediasite recorder costs of $982 thousand for hardware and other costs, $103 thousand for freight and $229 thousand of labor and allocated costs. Services costs. Staff wages and other costs allocated to cost of service revenue were $457 thousand in Q1-2014 and $371 thousand in Q1-2013, resulting in gross margin on services of 89% in Q1-2014 and 90% in Q1-2013. Operating Expenses



Selling and Marketing Expenses

Selling and marketing expenses include wages and commissions for sales, marketing and business development personnel, print advertising and various promotional expenses for our products. Timing of these costs may vary greatly depending on introduction of new products and services or entrance into new markets, or participation in major tradeshows.

Q1-2014 compared to Q1-2013



Selling and marketing expenses increased $369 thousand or 12% from $3.0 million in Q1-2013 to $3.4 million in Q1-2014. Major components of the change include:

Increased salary, incentive compensation and benefits of $132 thousand due to slightly higher staff levels Tradeshows and travel increased by $95 thousand due to an increase in tradeshow participation. Costs allocated from General and Administrative increased by $94 thousand primarily as a result of higher stock compensation expense.



We anticipate selling and marketing headcount to grow minimally throughout the remainder of the fiscal year.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative ("G&A") expenses consist of personnel and related costs associated with the facilities, finance, legal, human resource and information technology departments, as well as other expenses not fully allocated to functional areas.

Q1-2014 compared to Q1-2013



G&A expenses increased $145 thousand or 18% above the prior period from $815 thousand in Q1-2013 to $960 thousand in Q1-2014. Differences in the major categories include:

Increase in compensation and benefits of $52 thousand related to an increase in headcount. Professional services increase of $93 thousand, mainly due to legal costs.



We anticipate general and administrative headcount to grow minimally throughout the remainder of the fiscal year.

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Product Development Expenses

Product development expenses include salaries and wages of the software research and development staff and an allocation of benefits, facility and administrative expenses.

Q1-2014 compared to Q1-2013



Product development expenses increased $59 thousand, or 5% from $1.18 million in Q1-2013 to $1.24 million in Q1-2014 resulting primarily from a $37 thousand increase in outsourced labor. Costs allocated from General and Administrative increased by $26 thousand primarily as a result of higher stock compensation expense.

We anticipate product development headcount to be consistent during the remainder of the fiscal year. We do not anticipate that any fiscal 2014 software development efforts will qualify for capitalization.

Acquisition Costs

During the first quarter of fiscal 2014, the Company incurred acquisition costs related to acquiring MediaMission Holding B.V. in the Netherlands and Mediasite KK in Japan (acquired during the second quarter of fiscal 2014). These costs consisted of professional services incurred and incentive compensation earned totaling $450 thousand. We anticipate incurring additional costs related to the acquisition and integration of these two companies during the remainder of the fiscal year at a significantly lower amount than the expenses incurred during the first quarter of this year.

Other Income and Expense, Net

Under the equity method of accounting, we record our proportional share of earnings in Mediasite KK on a one quarter lag. At December 31, 2013, we owned approximately 26% of their common stock. We recorded $23 thousand of net equity in earnings during the quarter ended December 31, 2013. During the second fiscal quarter of 2014, this initial investment will be valued at the same amount as the value when control was achieved which will result in a non-cash gain of approximately $1.3 million.

Other expense primarily consists of interest costs related to outstanding debt. Other income is primarily interest income from overnight investment vehicles.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Cash provided by operating activities was $38 thousand in Q1-2014 compared to $124 thousand in Q1-2013, a decrease of $86 thousand. Cash provided by operating activities in Q1-2014 decreased partly due to the negative impacts of working capital and other changes including a net loss of $690 thousand, a $86 thousand increase in prepaid expenses and other current assets, an increase of $79 thousand in inventory and a $199 thousand decrease in in unearned revenue. These were mostly offset by the positive effects $282 thousand of stock based compensation, $296 thousand of depreciation expense, a $266 thousand decrease in accounts receivable and a $174 thousand increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities. In Q1-2013, working capital and other changes included the positive effects of $182 thousand of stock based compensation, $252 thousand of depreciation expense, $262 thousand decrease in accounts receivable and a $323 thousand increase in unearned revenue. These were mostly offset by the negative effects of a $351 decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities, an increase of $190 thousand in inventory, an increase in $180 thousand of prepaid expenses and other current assets and $78 thousand of equity in earnings from investment in Mediasite KK.

Cash used in investing activities was $236 thousand in Q1-2014 compared to a use of $143 thousand in Q1-2013. In Q1-2014, $119 thousand was used related to the acquisition of MediaMission B.V. and the remainder was due to purchases of property and equipment. Investing activities in Q1-2013 were all due to purchases of property and equipment.

Cash used in financing activities was $187 thousand in Q1-2014 compared to $173 thousand in Q1-2013. Cash used in Q1-2014 was due primarily to $222 thousand of cash used for payments on notes payable and capital leases. This was partially offset by $35 thousand proceeds from exercise of common stock options. Cash used in Q1-2013 was due primarily to $201 thousand of cash used for payments on notes payable and capital leases. This was partially offset by $28 thousand proceeds from exercise of common stock options.

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The Company believes its cash position is adequate to accomplish its business plan through at least the next twelve months, including the cash outlays related to the two international acquisitions of Mediasite KK and MediaMission. The Company paid $1.9 million to Mediasite KK former shareholders during January 2014. We will likely evaluate operating or capital lease opportunities to finance equipment purchases in the future and anticipate utilizing the Company's revolving line of credit to support working capital needs. We may also seek additional equity financing, or issue additional shares previously registered in our available shelf registration, although we currently have no plans to do so.

On June 27, 2011, the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, Sonic Foundry Media Systems, Inc. (the "Companies") entered into the Second Amended and Restated Loan and Security Agreement with Silicon Valley Bank (the "Second Amended Agreement"). Under the Second Amended Agreement, the revolving line of credit has a maximum principal amount of $3,000,000. Interest accrues on the revolving line of credit at the per annum rate of one percent (1.0%) above the Prime Rate (as defined), provided that Sonic Foundry maintains an Adjusted Quick Ratio (as defined) of greater than 2.0 to 1.0, or one-and-one half percent (1.5%) above the Prime Rate, if Sonic Foundry does not maintain an Adjusted Quick Ratio of greater than 2.0 to 1.0. The Second Amended Agreement does not provide for a minimum interest rate on the revolving loan. The Second Amended Agreement also provides for an increase in the advance rate on domestic receivables from 75% to 80%, and extends the facility maturity date to October 1, 2013. Under the Second Amended Agreement, the existing term loan will continue to accrue interest at a per annum rate equal to the greater of (i) one percentage point (1.0%) above Silicon Valley Bank's prime rate; or (ii) eight and three quarters percent (8.75%). In addition, a new term loan can be issued in multiple draws provided that the total term loan from Silicon Valley Bank shall not exceed $2,000,000 and provided further that total term debt shall not exceed $2,400,000. Under the Second Amended Agreement, any new draws on the term loan will accrue interest at a per annum rate equal to the Prime Rate plus three and three quarters percent (3.75%), or three-and-one quarter percent (3.25%) above the Prime Rate if Sonic Foundry maintains an Adjusted Quick Ratio of greater than 2.0 to 1.0. The Second Amended Agreement does not provide for a minimum interest rate on the new term loan. Each draw on the new term loan will be amortized over a 36-month period. The Second Amended Agreement also requires Sonic Foundry to continue to comply with certain financial covenants, including covenants to maintain an Adjusted Quick Ratio (as defined) of at least 1.75 to 1.00 and Debt Service Coverage Ratio of at least 1.25 to 1.00, the latter of which will be waived if certain funds are reserved against the availability under the revolving line of credit.

On May 31, 2013, the Company entered into a First Amendment to the Second Amended and Restated Loan and Security Agreement (the "First Amendment") with Silicon Valley Bank. Under the First Amendment: (i) the Revolving Loan Maturity Date (as defined) was extended from October 1, 2013 to October 1, 2015, (ii) the interest rate on the revolving line of credit was decreased so that interest will accrue at the per annum rate of three quarters of one percent (0.75 %) above the Prime Rate (as defined), provided that Sonic Foundry maintains an Adjusted Quick Ratio (as defined) of greater than 2.0 to 1.0, or one-and-one quarter percent (1.25%) above the Prime Rate, if Sonic Foundry does not maintain an Adjusted Quick Ratio of greater than 2.0 to 1.0, (iii) the interest rate on the Unused Revolving Loan Facility Fee (as defined) was decreased to seventeen and one-half hundredths of one percent (0.175%), and (iv) the restriction on the ability of Sonic Foundry to repurchase up to $1,000,000 of its common stock was removed. The repurchasing of common stock clause was removed with the new bank agreement on January 10, 2014.

At December 31, 2013, a balance of $600 thousand was outstanding on the term loans with Silicon Valley Bank, with an effective interest rate of six-and-one half percent (6.5%), and no balance was outstanding on the revolving line of credit. At September 30, 2013, a balance of $767 thousand was outstanding on the term loans with Silicon Valley Bank and no balance was outstanding on the revolving line of credit. At December 31, 2013, there was $2.4 million available under this credit facility for advances. At December 31, 2013 the Company was in compliance with all covenants in the Second Amended Agreement.

On January 10, 2014, the Companies entered into a Second Amendment to Second Amended and Restated Loan and Security Agreement (the "Second Amendment") with Silicon Valley Bank. Under the Second Amendment upon funding: (i) the balance of the term loan payable to Silicon Valley Bank of approximately $544,000 will be repaid

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and replaced by a new term loan of $2,500,000 to be repaid in 36 equal monthly principal payments, (ii) the interest rate is decreased so that interest will accrue at the Prime Rate (as defined) plus two and one quarter percent (which equates to an interest rate of 5.5%) from the Prime Rate plus three and one quarter percent (which equates to an interest rate of 6.5%) payable on the previous loan from Silicon Valley Bank, (iii) the covenant that requires the Minimum Adjusted Quick ratio be at or greater than 1.75:1.0 is reduced to 1.5:1.0, (iv) the Debt Service Coverage ratio is changed to a quarterly test rather than monthly, (v) the approval to repurchase up to $1,000,000 of outstanding shares of common stock is eliminated, (vi) the purchase of all the outstanding stock in Media Mission Holding B.V., a Netherlands corporation and Mediasite KK, a Japanese corporation is approved, and (vii) a maximum limit of bank indebtedness of Mediasite KK of $500,000 is provided for. The funding occurred contemporaneously with the closing of the Company's purchase of the outstanding common stock of Mediasite KK on January 17, 2014 which was effective January 14, 2014. At December 31, 2013, the Company was also in compliance with the modified covenants in the Second Amendment.

The Company enters into unconditional purchase commitments on a regular basis for the supply of Mediasite product. At December 31, 2013, the Company has an obligation to purchase $621 thousand of Mediasite product, which is not recorded on the Company's Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.

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Source: Edgar Glimpses


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