News Column

Researchers' Work from Vanderbilt University Focuses on Solid Cancer

February 19, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Biotech Week -- Research findings on Oncology are discussed in a new report. According to news originating from Nashville, Tennessee, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, "Nanoparticles (NP) have emerged as a novel class of therapeutic agents that overcome many of the limitations of current cancer chemotherapeutics. However, a major challenge to many current NP platforms is unfavorable biodistribution, and limited tumor uptake, upon systemic delivery."

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from Vanderbilt University, "Delivery, therefore, remains a critical barrier to widespread clinical adoption of NP therapeutics. To overcome these limitations, we have adapted the techniques of image-guided local drug delivery to develop nanoablation and nanoembolization. Nanoablation is a tumor ablative strategy that employs image-guided placement of electrodes into tumor tissue to electroporate tumor cells, resulting in a rapid influx of NPs that is not dependent on cellular uptake machinery or stage of the cell cycle. Nanoembolization involves the image-guided delivery of NPs and embolic agents directly into the blood supply of tumors. We describe the design and testing of our innovative local delivery strategies using doxorubicin-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (DOX-SPI0s) in cell culture, and the N151 hepatoma and VX2 tumor models, imaged by high resolution 71 MRI. We demonstrate that local delivery techniques result in significantly increased intratumoral DOX-SPIO uptake, with limited off-target delivery in tumor-bearing animal models."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "The techniques described are versatile enough to be extended to any NP platform, targeting any solid organ malignancy that can be accessed via imaging guidance."

For more information on this research see: Image-Guided Local Delivery Strategies Enhance Therapeutic Nanoparticle Uptake in Solid Tumors. ACS Nano, 2013;7(9):7724-7733. ACS Nano can be contacted at: Amer Chemical Soc, 1155 16TH St, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA. (American Chemical Society - www.acs.org; ACS Nano - www.pubs.acs.org/journal/ancac3)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from S.K. Mouli, Vanderbilt University, Sch Med, Dept. of Radiol & Radiol Sci, Nashville, TN 37232, United States. Additional authors for this research include P. Tyler, J.L. McDevitt, A.C. Eifler, Y. Guo, J. Nicolai, R.J. Lewandowski, W.G. Li, D. Procissi, R.K. Ryu, Y.A. Wang, R. Salem, A.C. Larson and R.A. Omary (see also Oncology).

Keywords for this news article include: Therapy, Oncology, Nashville, Tennessee, Nanoparticle, United States, Solid Cancers, Nanotechnology, Emerging Technologies, North and Central America

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Source: Biotech Week


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