News Column

Patent Issued for System for Anchoring Medical Devices

January 29, 2014



By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Journal of Engineering -- A patent by the inventors Rosenberg, Michael S. (Eagan, MN); Christianson, Mark R. (Plymouth, MN); Taylor, Kyle P. (Brooklyn Park, MN); Forsberg, Andrew T. (Plymouth, MN), filed on July 5, 2012, was published online on January 14, 2014, according to news reporting originating from Alexandria, Virginia, by VerticalNews correspondents.

Patent number 8628511 is assigned to INTERRAD Medical, Inc. (Plymouth, MN).

The following quote was obtained by the news editors from the background information supplied by the inventors: "Venous, arterial, and body fluid catheters are commonly used by physicians. For example, such catheters may be used to gain access to the vascular system for dialysis, for introducing pharmaceutical agents, for nutrition or fluids, for hemodynamic monitoring, and for blood draws. Alternatively, catheters can be used for drainage of fluid collections and to treat infection. Following introduction into the patient, the catheter is secured to the patient. In conventional practice, the catheter is commonly secured to the patient using an adhesive tape on the skin or by suturing a catheter hub to the patient's skin."

In addition to the background information obtained for this patent, VerticalNews journalists also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent: "Some embodiments of a medical device anchor system include an anchor device that receives a medical instrument (such as a catheter or the like) and secures the instrument in place relative to a skin penetration point. In some circumstances, the anchor device can be designed to be inserted through the skin penetration point that is already occupied by the medical instrument, thus allowing the anchor device to be used after medical instrument is already in place and reducing the need for a second penetration point for the anchor device. In particular embodiments, the anchor device may have a multi-piece design that can simplify post-operative removal and reduce trauma to surrounding tissue near the skin penetration point. For example, the anchor device can be separated into at least two portions prior to removal from the skin penetration point. In these circumstances, the separable portions may each include a subcutaneous anchor, and each anchor can be removed from the skin penetration point independently of the other in a manner that reduces the likelihood of damage to the tissue surrounding the skin penetration point.

"In some embodiments, an anchor device may include a retainer body to releasably couple to a catheter. The retainer body may be separable into a first body portion and a second body portion. The device may also include first and second anchors that extend distally from the retainer body. Each anchor may comprise a flexible tine that is deployable in a subcutaneous region to secure the retainer body relative to a penetration point. The first anchor may be coupled to the first body portion, and the second anchor may be coupled to the second body portion. The first and second body portions may be releasably coupled together so that the first and second anchors are collectively deployable into the subcutaneous region. Also, the first and second body portions may be separable from one another when the first and second anchors are deployed in the subcutaneous region so that the first anchor is removable from the subcutaneous region independent of the second anchor.

"Particular embodiments include an anchor system for securing the position of a medical instrument. The system may include a medical instrument that is insertable into a skin penetration point. Also the system may include an anchor device comprising a retainer body and one or more subcutaneous anchors. The retainer body may releasably secure with the medical instrument when the medical instrument is inserted into the skin penetration point. The one or more anchors may extend distally from the retainer body and toward the skin penetration point when the medical instrument is inserted into the skin penetration point. Each anchor may comprise a tine that deploys in a subcutaneous region to secure the retainer body relative to the skin penetration point.

"In certain embodiments, a method of anchoring a catheter may include advancing a catheter though a skin penetration point. The method may also include directing an anchor device toward the skin penetration point that is occupied by a portion of the catheter. The anchor device may comprise a retainer body to releasably couple to an external portion of the catheter arranged outside the body, and at least one anchor extending distally from the retainer body. The method may further include inserting the anchor through the skin penetration point that is occupied by the catheter so that at least a portion of the anchor is deployed in a subcutaneous region proximate the skin penetration point.

"These and other embodiments may provide one or more of the following advantages. First, some embodiments of an anchor system can retain a medical instrument in a desired position relative to a skin penetration point without necessarily requiring sutures or skin adhesives. Second, in some embodiments, an anchor device can include a retention portion that readily mates with a medical instrument (such as a catheter) and at least one anchor extending distally from the retention portion to engage the skin penetration point as the medical instrument. Third, the anchor device can include one or more anchors configured to deploy in a subcutaneous region under the skin proximate to the skin penetration point of the medical instrument. In such circumstances, the anchors may be inserted through the skin penetration point in a manner that reduces the likelihood of trauma to the surround skin tissue. Fourth, in some embodiments, the anchor device may include multiple components that are separable from one another before the anchor device is removed from the skin. For example, the anchor device may include a first portion and a second portion that are coupled together (as the fully assembled anchor device) during insertion into the skin penetration point, but the first and second portions can be readily separated from one another to facilitate removal from the skin. Accordingly, the anchors 120a and 120b (including the tines 130a and 130b) can collectively penetrate into the subcutaneous region 34 as part of the assembled device 100, and may be separately and individually withdrawn from penetration point 34 during the removal process. Such a configuration can permit the first and second portions to be maneuvered in a manner that reduces the likelihood of causing damage to the skin during removal of the anchors.

"The details of one or more embodiments of the invention are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, objects, and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims."

URL and more information on this patent, see: Rosenberg, Michael S.; Christianson, Mark R.; Taylor, Kyle P.; Forsberg, Andrew T.. System for Anchoring Medical Devices. U.S. Patent Number 8628511, filed July 5, 2012, and published online on January 14, 2014. Patent URL: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=69&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=3407&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=20140114.PD.&OS=ISD/20140114&RS=ISD/20140114

Keywords for this news article include: INTERRAD Medical Inc.

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Source: Journal of Engineering


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