News Column

Veterans Long-Term Care Needs May Be Evolving, but Government Has a Duty of Care for All Veterans

Aug 16 2013 12:00AM

Marketwire

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OTTAWA, ONTARIO -- (Marketwired) -- 08/16/13 -- The recent release of the Veterans Ombudsman's report entitled Veteran's Long-Term Care Needs reaffirms the position of The Royal Canadian Legion that the Government of Canada has a moral obligation to provide for the men and women who are injured in the service of Canada. This report equally reinforces the position taken by the Veterans Consultation Group in their May 2013 letter to the Minister of Veterans Affairs calling on a health care reform/review within the next year. (http://bit.ly/143WkwL)

"The Royal Canadian Legion fully recognizes that the Veteran population served by the Long-Term Care program is changing, both in age and service requirements," says Dominion President Gordon Moore. "What this means is that the support requirements from the Government must also adapt to serve not only aging Veterans, but also those younger Veterans who are going to require care throughout the course of their lives," adds Moore.

The Legion serves all Veterans and far too often Canadians forget that a Veteran is not just someone who served in World War Two or the Korean War. "All Veterans who have been injured in their service to Canada need to be assured that programs and services are available and easily accessible," says Moore. "The younger Veteran who has seen recent service will require care just like the aging Veteran of previous conflicts who, 40 or 50 years ago required care when they were injured. Regardless of when or where a Veteran served the government has a duty of care," adds Moore.

The Veterans Ombudsman's report points out several deficiencies in the existing care provision system. Notably these include:

-- Modern day Veterans (anyone who served after 1947 but excluding Korean War Veterans) have the least accessibility to long-term care;-- The process of obtaining long-term care is difficult requiring "considerable navigation" through provincial and federal government health care systems; and-- Families of Veterans continue to experience high levels of frustration not only from time delays in obtaining service but also in receiving equitable disability assessments from Veterans Affairs Canada.



Not only is the Legion seeking to ensure the Federal Government retains and evolves its health care responsibilities for Veterans, the Legion also calls on all Provincial Governments to respond to the changing needs of the Veteran population - again recognizing that there are not just aging Veterans but also younger Veterans requiring adequate, life-long care. "Provincial Government Health Care programs are the first point of review for any Veteran to be considered for long-term care," says Moore, "and they must never forget the ongoing duty of care they also owe the men and women who have served in the name of their provinces," adds Moore.

The Royal Canadian Legion will never waiver in its efforts to ensure all governments respond to the changing needs of Canadian Armed Forces personnel, RCMP members, Veterans and their families. There is one Veteran and the Legion serves all Veterans. Always have. Always will.

About the Legion

Established in 1926, the Legion is the largest Veterans service organization in Canada with more than 320,000 members. Its mission is to serve all Veterans including serving Canadian Forces and Royal Canadian Mounted Police members and their families, to promote Remembrance and to serve our communities and our country.

The Legion's Service Bureau Network provides assistance and representation to all Veterans including serving CF and RCMP members, and their families regarding their disability claims, benefits and services from Veterans Affairs Canada and the Veterans Review and Appeal Board. In communities across Canada, it is the Legion that perpetuates Remembrance through the Poppy Campaign and Remembrance Day ceremonies. With more than 1,450 branches, The Legion supports programs for seniors, Veterans housing, Long Term Care, youth leadership, education, sports, Cadets, Guides and Scouts.

We will Remember Them.



Contacts:
Bruce Poulin
Dominion Command
The Royal Canadian Legion
1-613-591-3335 ext. 241
Cell: 1-613-292-8760
bruce.poulin@legion.ca





Source: Marketwire


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