News Column

Cubs Don't Feel Sorry for Braun

July 23, 2013

The Chicago Cubs were neither surprised nor sympathetic after hearing the news on Ryan Braun's season-ending suspension for his involvement in the Biogenesis scandal.

Alfonso Soriano said he was only surprised "because of the talent" Braun has, knowing the outfielder did not need performance-enhancing drugs to be a superstar.

"Sometimes people don't realize how good they are, and they want to go try something else," he said.

Jeff Samardzija said he didn't feel sorry for someone who "shouldn't be taking things he shouldn't be taking, and connected to people he shouldn't be connected to."

The fact that Braun was involved in two PED scandals was not lost on Samardzija, who believes cheaters will ultimately get caught.

"Nowdays you can't hide from anything," he said. "That's what it tells you. Everything you do is going to be (discovered). It's going to be talked about. So if it's something you don't like, then you shouldn't be doing it."

Manager Dale Sveum, who coached Braun in Milwaukee, called it "unfortunate" for baseball and the Brewers.

"I'm just glad it's finally over, that he has to deal with it," Sveum said. "He's come out and admitted to the public and apologized. It's the best thing that can happen for Braun and the organization, to be able to play opening day next year and everything's behind him...

"The players he let down and (Brewers owner Mark) Attanasio and (GM) Doug Melvin and the whole group over there, the fans who have supported him for six years in that organization. Now it's finished and over and they can move on."

Soriano said "if they want to clean baseball, it's good" that Braun and the rest of the Biogenesis culprits get penalized. He said he would never use performance-enhancing drugs because he wouldn't want to embarrass his family.

"Family, friends, fans, what you do to your teammates- all that kind of stuff," he said. "The money is not important. It's how people want to treat your family. I never want to do anything negative because I couldn't handle seeing someone treating my family different because I did something wrong. That's what I try to do with my life, even outside of baseball."

psullivan@tribune.com

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