News Column

BofA Slips Teach for America $10,000

July 12, 2013

Staff Reports -- HispanicBusiness.com

Bank of America and the California Community Foundation hosted a reception last month for Elisa Villanueva Bear, co-CEO of Teach for America, at which the banking giant presented the educational organization with a check for $10,000.

Attendees included Antonia Hernandez, president and CEO of the California Community Foundation; Raul Anaya, Los Angeles market president for Bank of America; and Tom Saenz, president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF).

"More than 90 percent of the local students we serve are Latino, and we're excited to deepen our partnerships with Latino leaders in the city," Lida Jennings, interim executive director of Teach for America-Los Angeles, said in a statement. "We're grateful to Raul and Antonia for making this event possible."

Nearly 300 Teach for America corps members are reaching more than 21,000 students in underserved schools in L.A. this year, while 1,500 alumni work to level the playing field for students and families in low-income communities, according to a news release.

The effect of having a Teach for America educator in the classroom corresponds to an additional month and a half of schooling, according to a report by the Harvard Strategic Data Project. Teach for America members have a positive impact across grade levels and subject areas, especially math, according to the release.

"Bank of America is proud to support Teach For America in a shared vision to improve the economic health of local communities through education," Anaya said. "We focus our philanthropic efforts on workforce development and educational programs to help adults and young people gain the training and education opportunities that translate into employment and post-secondary success."

Founded in 1990, Teach for America recruits and develops a diverse corps of outstanding individuals of all academic disciplines to commit two years to teach in high-need schools. For more information, click here.



Source: HispanicBusiness.com (c) 2013. All rights reserved.


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