News Column

Radio Got Its Revenge on the Video Stars

May 31, 2013

Dan Craft, Pantagraph entertainment editor

Postscript to today's news that Pauly Shore is not dead: No, Virginia, old MTV VJs don't fade away ... they wind up as voices- only on Sirius/XM's "80s on 8," current audio repository for Martha Quinn, Mark Goodman, Nina Blackwood and Alan Hunter - four-fifths of the original freshman class.

Video killed the radio star, our foot.

- In case you'd forgotten, as we had: one of the original MTV VJs has, in fact, passed - the missing fifth from the freshman class, J.J. Jackson, who succumbed to a heart attack in 2004, at 62.

Already pushing 40 when MTV debuted 33 years ago this August, Jackson was the demographic freak among his peers, most of whom were kept securely under 30 and escorted out to pasture as the day of reckoning approached.

- None of which accounts, of course, for MTV's longest-runner outside the now-obsolete VJ ranks ... that elder among elders, news anchor Kurt Loder, who turned 68 several weeks ago.

That makes Loder, who joined MTV in 1987, senior to most regular evening network newscasters, none over 60 (NBC's Brian Williams, 54; ABC's Diana Perez, 32; CBS's Scott Pelley, 55; et al.).

- When it rains it pours, even more than the literal stuff that has deluged us this past week.

Just as we headed to press with last week's GO! cover story previewing a movie to be shot around town this summer - B-N native Andy Steadman's "We Had This Band" - word arrived of a second shoot in progress.

Check out the details in the "Short Takes" column inside, with one late-breaking addendum, per the Main Street Bar & Grill fund- raising party mentioned in the blurb.

According to our "Graveyard Menace" contact, Tracy Haas Riley, "The crew will be filming a song that the band, My God the Heat, will be doing for the movie.-The other interesting item is that the crew will be filming parts of the party to use Saturday night in a DVD version.-You and I still have a chance to be in this movie!"

Combine that with the "We Had This Band" concert shoot July 7 at the Castle Theatre and - here's one for Guinness folk - Twin Citians have the chance to be seen in concert-crowd scenes of two movies.

- This just in, too: Recent GO! section cover-boy, MTV darling and B-N concert performer Rick Springfield is in the news with an offbeat addendum to his never-ending story.

Fast on the heels of his own memoir "Late, Late at Night," Springfield has penned his first novel, "Magnificent Vibration," due a year from now and, per an Associated Press report, about a "tough- times protagonist who receives a 1-800 phone connection with God through a self-help book."

Not that he'll listen to us, but we suggest a better title: "Hard to Put on Hold."

- Finally, yet one more addendum related to a recent GO! cover story subject, Doors architect Ray Manzarek, who recently died, just a few years after playing the Castle Theatre with then-partner Roy Rogers.

In last week's column, we excerpted our 2010 interview with Ray, in which he recalled the band never making it downstate from his own native Chicago.

Reader Garry Boughan of Bloomington kindly checked in with this dispatch from the past: The Doors did, in fact, play a downstate show at, of all places, the Canton High School Auditorium in Canton.

"It was quite a story back in the day," he recalled.

The show took place, per www.thedoorsguide.com, on Sept. 13, 1967, just several days before the band's now-fabled appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show" - their first live TV gig, featuring "Light My Fire" performed intact, despite Ed's edict that the "we couldn't get much higher" line be shorn of the "higher" part.

Per the record of the event, recorded in detail at www.edsullivan.com:

"Backstage, the show's producer was furious and told the band Mr. Sullivan wanted you for six more shows, but you'll never work The Ed Sullivan Show again.'

"To which Morrison purportedly replied, Hey, man.-We just did the Sullivan show.'"

Dan Craft is Pantagraph entertainment editor. He can be reached at 309-829-9000, Ext. 259 or via email at dcraft@pantagraph.com

, on Sept. 13, 1967, just several days before the band's now- fabled appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show" - their first live TV gig, featuring "Light My Fire" performed intact, despite Ed's edict that the "we couldn't get much higher" line be shorn of the "higher" part.

Per the record of the event, recorded in detail at www.edsullivan.com:

"Backstage, the show's producer was furious and told the band Mr. Sullivan wanted you for six more shows, but you'll never work The Ed Sullivan Show again.'

"To which Morrison purportedly replied, Hey, man.-We just did the Sullivan show.'"

Dan Craft is Pantagraph entertainment editor. He can be reached at 309-829-9000, Ext. 259 or via email at dcraft@pantagraph.com

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