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1 Day in May Raises Awareness About Daily Realities of Multiple Sclerosis

May 1 2013 12:00AM

Marketwire

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TORONTO, ONTARIO -- (Marketwired) -- 05/01/13 -- Multiple sclerosis is a complex disease. The symptoms of MS vary and often times cannot be seen. This May, the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada launches 1 Day in May, a campaign to raise awareness about MS and the lives of Canadians impacted by the disease.

Every day, thousands of Canadians navigate their day-to-day lives with multiple sclerosis; a lot can happen in a day with respect to MS.

"I live with a lot of the different symptoms of MS," says Gaby DiVirgilio-Mammone, a business owner, mother and advocate for people living with the disease. "I often experience blotches in my vision that make me feel like I'm wearing dirty glasses, and I have to look through the clean spots to be able to see. I sometimes fall because of issues with my balance.... I wake up and never know what the day will bring."

1 Day in May urges people to raise awareness and support people living with MS. Canadians are encouraged to choose a day in May to take action for those impacted by MS. Every single act, big or small, is a step towards a stronger community presence and the collective movement to help end MS in Canada.

"MS is a disease that not only affects the person diagnosed, but also the people who are close to them," says Norine Thomason, recipient of the MS Society of Canada's 2012 National Opal Award for Caregivers. "I've been caring for my husband Bill for more than 40 years. MS has impacted our course in life and our relationship; but using the words of my children, living with MS is the norm, we don't know anything else."

Through understanding the symptoms of MS and sharing the experiences of those affected by the disease, you can make a difference. One day in May, show your support for people impacted by MS:

-- Participate in your local MS Walk and MS Carnation Campaign to raise awareness and funds for people living with MS.-- Join the MS Research Webinar on Wednesday, May 15 at 6:00-8:00 pm Eastern to learn about the latest news in MS research.-- Write to your local Member of Parliament and help bring change to income security.-- Get an oil change at Mr. Lube from May 10-12, and a donation will be made to the MS Society.-- Visit Canadian landmarks and buildings, such as the Science World in B.C., BC Place, Niagara Falls and the CN Tower, which will be lit up red on World MS Day on May 29.-- Share your photos of what 1 Day in May means to you on Instagram using #1dayinMay; take pictures of Canadian landmarks lit up red and tag #1dayinMay.-- Display a 1 Day in May poster in your office, community centres and other communal spaces.



"We are fortunate to have a strong support system within our family and friends," says Norine. "They've seen the challenges that MS brings to my family, and they got involved in their own way to help us out. Not everyone may have the same level of support, and this is why we need others to be more aware of what MS can do to a family."

One day in May tell someone about MS, and take action to help end this disease. Visit 1DayinMay.ca to know more how you can be part of the movement.

About multiple sclerosis and the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, often disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord. It is the most common neurological disease of young adults in Canada. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 40, and the unpredictable effects of MS last for the rest of their lives. The MS Society provides services to people with MS and their families and funds research to find the cause and cure for this disease. Please visit mssociety.ca or call 1-800-268-7582 to make a donation or for more information.



Contacts:
Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada
Claudette Villena
Media Relations & Communications Specialist
416-922-6600 x3177
claudette.villena@mssociety.ca
www.mssociety.ca





Source: Marketwire


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