News Column

Pennsylvanians Concerned About Possible Gas Tax Shift

Jan 30, 2013

Tom Fontaine

Gas Tax

Four out of five Pennsylvania voters worry that a proposal to lift the cap on a tax that gasoline wholesalers pay would raise prices at gas stations, according to a poll released Wednesday morning.

The Quinnipiac University poll shows that 47 percent of Pennsylvania voters oppose lifting the cap, while 45 percent support it, to raise up to $2 billion in additional money for transportation needs across the state.

Gov. Tom Corbett is expected to release a plan to generate more money for transportation during his budget address on Feb. 5. As part of the plan, Corbett is expected to remove a cap on the oil company franchise tax, which is applied per gallon to the first $1.25 of the average wholesale price.

About 82 percent of voters are "very concerned" or "somewhat concerned" that such a move would be passed on to consumers at the pump.

The poll also showed that 57 percent of voters think Pennsylvania gun-control laws should be more strict, 4 percent think they should be less strict and 35 percent want laws to be kept as they are. Similarly, 60 percent of those polled think national laws should be more strict, 5 percent think they should be less strict and 32 percent think they should stay the same, the poll said.

Pennsylvania voters also are divided on allowing same-sex marriage, with 47 percent in favor and 43 percent opposed, the poll said.

The poll, conducted Jan. 22-27, surveyed 1,221 registered voters. The margin of error is 2.8 percentage points.

___



Distributed by MCT Information Services


For more coverage on the automotive industry, please see HispanicBusiness' Auto Channel



Source: (c) 2013 The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (Greensburg, Pa.)