News Column

The 2012 Hispanic Vote: Reshaping the Electoral Map

Feb. 16, 2012
Hispanic voters at polling place

Today, LULAC announced the strategies to increase the Latino voter registration and turnout, as well as the efforts to defend the rights of Latino voters across the country.

In partnership with these two national grassroots organizations, LULAC discussed the issues that are motivating Latino voters, and how Latino voters are reshaping the electoral map.

"It is now less than three weeks before Super Tuesday, and the candidates for president have failed to address issues of concern to the Hispanic community," said National LULAC President Margaret Moran. "Sadly, some have attempted to engage the Hispanic electorate through superficial rhetoric. Others have dismissed the Hispanic vote altogether and certain states are attempting to pass legislation designed to suppress the vote. Today, LULAC addressed the issues the Latino community is concerned about, as well as the impact the Latino vote will have on the election, given that the Hispanic turnout is expected to be 26 percent greater than it was in 2008."

"Our march to the ballot box begins today," said Ben Monterroso, national executive director for Mi Familia Vota Education Fund. "Hundreds of Mi Familia Vota volunteers will canvass neighborhoods throughout the country to register every eligible Latino to vote and to ensure that their voice is heard at the ballot box. Collaborations such as the one we have with LULAC and LCLAA prove to others that the road to the White House runs through the 'barrios.'"

"As the 2012 elections approach, the future of the Latino community is at a critical juncture. Participating in the electoral process provides Latinos with the opportunity to demand justice, dignity, better opportunities for their children and accountability from their elected officials. The Latino vote will play a decisive role in the coming elections and in light of growing attacks on their voting rights, we will work to ensure that their voices are heard," said Hector E. Sanchez, executive director of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA).

The 2010 Census confirmed that the Latino community, now 50.5 million strong, is the nation's largest minority group. Not surprisingly, Latino voters are poised to play a decisive role in the upcoming 2012 elections, especially in the key battleground states of Florida, New Mexico, Nevada and Colorado. LULAC members and partners are helping to register and turnout a record number of Hispanic voters in November.

The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is a volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities. Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 900 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC's programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future. For more information, visit www.lulac.org.



Source: Copyright PRNewswire-USNewswire 2012


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