News Column

Hispanics Greet the Wireless World

June 2003, HISPANIC BUSINESS Magazine

Jesús Chavarría, Editor & Publisher

This issue's cover story is about more than Sol Trujillo, a successful telecommunications executive who now heads one of the world's largest wireless companies. Over the course of his career, Mr. Trujillo has evolved from being a prodigy at the University of Wyoming (getting his MBA in two semesters) to becoming an up-and-coming regional marketer, then CEO of US West, and finally reaching his present position as CEO of Orange Inc. It's the story of one Hispanic's journey from his roots to success in the global technology industry, and it marks a path for other Hispanics to follow.

In a sense, Mr. Trujillo's career trajectory epitomizes the coming evolution of the U.S. Hispanic professional. Two trends - technology and globalization - drive today's world economy, including the U.S. Hispanic economy. The impact of those drivers becomes apparent on the Hispanic Business 500 in this issue. Nearly one-quarter, or exactly 124 of the 500 companies on the directory, participate in globalization through importing or exporting. In terms of technology, nearly one-fifth (96) of the companies consider themselves "high-technology firms," meaning they develop advanced equipment or systems to provide their products or services. A record 416 of the 500 companies (83.2 percent) on this year's directory maintain a Web site.

Our presentation of the 500 also reflects technology adoption by the Hispanic market. For years, Hispanic Business has generated much more data on the 500 than could fit between the covers of the magazine. Previously, that material was simply edited out. But now readers can access additional charts and analysis of the largest Hispanic-owned companies at www.HispanicBusiness.com/go/more500. Also, a full transcript of the magazine's exclusive interview with Mr. Trujillo is available at www.HispanicBusiness.com/go/June03.

So in the context of technological innovation and the global business culture, the significance of Mr. Trujillo's ascension at Orange becomes less a personal success story and more a pointer to where U.S. Hispanic professionals are headed. With each passing year, economic forces will produce more multinational companies of all sizes engaged in wireless, Internet, and data management technologies. Clearly, the Hispanic markets must develop 21st-century CEOs to run those enterprises.

Hispanic Business takes seriously its mission to provide the informational tools our readers need to succeed in this environment. Those tools include economic data (see "Handicapping the 2003 Economy" and "HispanTelligence Quarterly" in this issue), coverage of successful companies such as those on the Hispanic Business 500, and profiles of corporate leaders such as Mr. Trujillo, who prove that Hispanic professionals can greet the wireless future with optimism, knowing we can meet its challenges.



Source: HISPANIC BUSINESS Magazine


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